I AM ALWAYS A MILLION YEAR AHEAD

I pay more attention to what people are not saying.  That is the mechanism that informs what they say. It is a catalyst that lubricates (y)our our analytical thinking.

I pay more attention to the seemingly unimportant things said in any conversation. It projects
the true personality of such person.

I pay more attention to that  unnoticed repeated treacherous attitude. It is a clue that discloses the actus reus, and the mens rea in the act. No matter how you pretend, I will decipher it. Save when there is no cognitive cross examination.

BOTTOM LINE:

Acting stupid in your eyes does not necessarily mean I am one. It only sisters the fact that I am more concerned with prudent and reasonable precautions and observations that are deemed expedient.

I am no advocate of conventional reasoning.

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STUDENTS’ CONFIDENCE: A PANACEA TO DEFY AND ERADICATE EXAMINATION MALPRACTICE CUM MISCONDUCT.

STUDENTS’ CONFIDENCE: A PANACEA TO DEFY AND ERADICATE EXAMINATION MALPRACTICE CUM MISCONDUCT.

An article written by Savn Daniel

What is confidence? According to the Cambridge Advanced dictionary (for the purpose of this article), confidence is the “quality of being certain of your abilities or having trust in people, plans or future.” According to this writer, confidence is converting your weakness and doubts into strength and certainty, at an early stage”.

From the above position, it can be said that confidence is appreciating your abilities, vulnerability and doubts, and preparing, acting and annihilating all forms of vices that may threaten one’s confidence. It must be condemned and fought, not only in strong terms but with a corresponding attitude and action. This was echoed by, among others one Saintmoses Eromosele (a London based publisher, journalist and lawyer) in his article “TAMING THE MENACE OF EXAMINATION MALPRACTICE IN NIGERIA” http://www.tigweb.org. Although, what most of these articles (www.hadizaoyas.com/tips/html, paper presentation by Aisha Nuraini ; effects of examination malpractice in Nigeria– Mohammed Sanusi Sani — http://www.dailyindependent.com; Examination malpractice, stumbling block to educational development–Nasiru Sulieman– http://www.gamji.com) have tried to react by echoing and addressing the menace of examination malpractice, but failed to provide pragmatic measures to curb examination malpractice from the grass level, thereby flawing the remedy process ab-initio.

From an informed position it can be deciphered that a plethora of articles trying to curb the menace of “examination malpractice” have failed to proffer pragmatic solutions- addressing the problem from its root – to impede the monstrous vice called examination malpractice. Some academic analyst have argued that lack of facilities, poor study habits and inability for schools to cover their syllabus (A survey of examination malpractice among secondary school students: causes, effects and solution—Blessing Adoke) on time are the corporeal pointer militating against the “confidence” of student. Anybody can criticise, what we need at this point are pragmatic measures to curb this menace. It should be noted that, these articles and book(s) proffer little or no practical steps to curbing examination malpractice. It is a prima facie that leaders, examination bodies and government, parents, invigilators and students are all guilty of this degrading practice. And it is, also, a prima facie that most students engage in examamination malpractice, due to, inter alia, LACK OF CONFIDENCE, which is collectively birthed from poor learning standards, poor or no learning facilities, incompetent teachers/instructors, trend of poor performance from students, poor or no orientation et al.

This hilarious, disastrous and unrealistic act, as it may sound, has snowballed into a socially accepted norm amongst (some) parents, teachers, principals, invigilators, and students. It is disheartening, pitiable and disgraceful to see parents solicit for criminating acts (instead of their children/wards), violating section 3(1) (a,b), 2(a,b,c), 3(a,b,c) of the EXAMINATION MALPRACTICES ACT 1999 No. 33. 10th May, 1999).

There is a big problem when parents, ward or care givers solicit people alleged to be “machineries” to aid either by writing or providing their children/ward with materials to score “good points”. These parents/wards lack CONFIDENCE on their children/wards intellectual proficiency.

Fast forward to the bane of this article; curbing and eradicating examination malpractice via utilitarian measures. To apprehend, prosecute and sentence this evil called examination malpractice, it will suffice to state that continues rigorous debate, quiz, and competition amongst students and schools should be encouraged. This exercise should be held per term, and must be in accordance with the school curriculum and scheme of work. There is also the need to change all schools curriculum to standard ones, as it is observed that most curriculum used by schools are obsolete, and does not chart the right teaching process for pupils and students of the 21st century. The rationale is that it will constantly keep students ahead of their school work, and keep them on their toes. This writer is beneficiary of the proffered remedy. Healthy reading culture and library visitation, and exploration should be made an obligation, and a prerequisite for an effective intellectual exercise/well being of every student. From an informed position, it is observed, and a prima facie that students no longer visit the library- an alarming status quo that needs compelling attention and a remedy at all cost(within the purview of the law).

Not just paper presentation(s). Research shows that students may never visit the library as it used to be (1950s,60,70 and even 80s), until qualitative and adequate (library) facilities are provided. Even when the facilities are put in place, parents, teachers/instructors must ensure that visitation of the library should be compulsory a culture. Yes! Now you are asking: what kind of books will the students be reading in the library? Books in his/her syllabus; their focus: scheme of work—reading ahead of time. Break periods should be reduced to 15 minutes. There should be a compulsory 45 minutes of personal reading time by students, and on returning to the class, students should be given the platform to summarise and explain what they read. It should be understood that these books are no strange books but books on subjects within the students’ scheme of work and syllabus.

Acts of aiding and abetting exam malpractice should be condemned in strong terms. The 1999 EXAMINATION MALPRACTICE ACT, NO. 33, and other ANTI-EXAMINATION MALPRACTICE legislation condemns examination malpractice in its entirety. More so, the government has been trying to curb this menace in its own way: Federal government approved five year jail term for examination malpractice or a fine of 200,000.00 or both, as was announced by the former Minister of Education, Ruqayyatu Ahmed Rufa’I after the federal council meeting. Wait! Do you think this is the solution? I don’t think so. Until the confidence of the students are given back to them via proper training/learning, commitment from stake holders, adequate and qualitative input from the Government. Until then, government should be prepared to arrest, prosecute and jail a lot of students. Until we get it right, examination malpractice will always be an inevitable air for survival. A compelling, competitive atmosphere for learning amongst students is a sure way of giving the students back their confidence.

Schools should re-define their break time and make library visitation a must, and on returning to their class rooms, students school be asked what they read about. This should not be construed as eliminating the legitimate refreshing periods of students; what we are saying here is that, the break time should be reduced. And this should be done in a guiding decorum to the core. Students are likely to learn little or nothing in a noisy atmosphere.

This healthy exercise should not be under-rated, neglected, or seen as unrealistic.

It is my submission that if the above mentioned and proffered remedy to curb and eradicate examination malpractice(s) is adhered to, we are sure of having our students back on their feet. And their confidence given back to them . . . This confidence was long stolen by a plethora of factors as mentioned above.

We hope to capture the negligible acts displayed by parents, and resurrect the zeal to study and stir confidence in our proverbial youth cum students, and future leaders.

God bless Nigeria.

Savn Daniel

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UNTIL YOU CHANGE YOURSELF FOR GOOD, NIGERIA WILL REMAIN THE SAME

UNTIL YOU CHANGE YOURSEFL FOR GOOD, NIGERIA WILL BE THE SAME

PART 1

An article written by Savn Daniel, 25th Of October, 2014

A Russian novelist, essayist and short story writer, who goes by the name Lev Nikolayevich Tolstoy, once opined, and I quote him verbatim: “Everyone thinks of changing the world, but no one thinks of changing himself.”

If we truly want or so desire for a modern, progressive and great Nigeria, then, its transformation process is a responsibility we all must share(thanks to Dr. Kuksenko). The brand of Nigeria we hanker after is tied to our deportment. It originates from charting the right affairs and embracing the acceptable cum good values. In all intent and purposes, as Nigerians, we are the problem and solution to this nation. Until we wake up from our slumber, fix up the mess and acknowledge these hard truths, we will remain where we are.

It is instructive to note that changing any democratic and civilised society leaves in shade mere tattling. It surpasses toy-matching [y]our appliances, making doddering propositions that have the proficiency of tearing this nation apart in a bid to be activists. It eclipses engendering defamatory and disparaging statements, knowing that it is potent of pulling the fence of nationhood painstakingly built by our founding fathers. As a people, contrary to our differences and what some monstrous politicians wants us to believe, we are one, and must strive to be the transformation we want to behold. If Nigeria is bad, it means we are bad- the retributive prospect of the whole melee is that we remain Nigerians as noted by the preamble of our grundnorm- The 1999 Constitution Of The federal Republic Of Nigeria(as amended); no matter how we try to shy away from these facts, this is Nigeria, our fatherland.

Most of the people blustering and yelling ‘corruption’ do not even know the [main] problem bedevilling this nation, yet, they want us to follow them. And this writer is under reasonable compulsion to ask: “Can a blind man lead another blind man?” If this nation we hold dear is dubbed a dysfunctional state, it is we who are dysfunctional not the state; we are the problem not the state. I think I can say this: “There is no such thing as a dysfunctional state. There are only dysfunctional people who are bent on making life difficult for others”. The trees are harmless, the land is fertile, the air is fresh, and its fragrance is just beautiful and pricelss . . . The solution and the problem lies with the people. Again, there is nothing wrong, bad or evil about Nigeria. Based on this writer’s observation, there are four categories of people in Nigeria: problem initiators; the problem munchers; unreasonable exploiter; the solution therapist; and the problem solver. It is either you contribute to the society or take away from Nigeria. Which are you?

One can not affect a system [positively] if he/she is not a change agent. You cannot change a system when your values are grossly despicable. You cannot change a system when there is something utterly wrong with the way you perceive people [who hold different views from yours]. You can not change the system when your creed, ethos and principles are anti-human. You cannot change the system if you see yourself as being better than everyone else. The mere criticising of the system/Government of the day, without a corresponding and effective action will change nothing. I reiterate, it will change nothing. Just as Dr. Kuksenko noted in page 10 of paragraph 1 of line 10 of his book, “Building Systems For National Transformation”: “If truth be told, only changed Nigerians, can change Nigeria. A new Nigeria can only emerge out of New Nigerians”. How sweet are truths that whenever it is said, the firmament acknowledges its truism, and the sanctity of its expression. When we begin to change our value system, something different begins to happen to us.

If we do not ask the right questions, we will never get the right answers, and may never do the right things. Until a man knows the direction of his compass, he may never know where he is navigating to, and even “why” he needs to plan-a-course. As a people, we must take responsibility for our welfare, for our actions and inactions. If every Nigerian will make it a duty to do what is right for six months, you’ll be amazed at what this nation will snowball into- stemming from the refusal to taking bribes; shunning corruption; being honest in all ramifications of our life; speak and preach the truth as if our life depended on it; respect differences; keep to time; respect our elders; value life; appeal to authorities; and obey their conscience. If we keep up with this attitude, Nigeria will be a better and enviable place to be. Mere nagging, ranting and cursing does not change a society, only good values do.

The United States of America, United Kingdom, Singapore and every other developed countries are what they are today because people got up and stood for what they preached, believed in and want. There is a saying that “Evil men thrive when good men do nothing”. Imagine what would happen if 70% of Nigerians changed themselves? Just envisage that! At this juncture, it is gut-wrenching to note that the Nigeria we’ve had over the years is a state where complaint, nagging, whining and rhetoric are charted as solutions. It is in this light that some have resorted to cheap blackmail as a struggle for liberty- the warped version of activism practised here in this neck of our wood.

Change is a gradual process, never automatic. Any change that is automatic comes with devastating casualties. For knowledge to be appreciated, it must be applicable, felt and pragmatic- it is the fusation of the abstract and pragmatic knowledge that brings change in a society. Could it be said that the problem with Nigeria and her citizens is not the knowledge( for the knowledge is there), but the ability to apply the desired knowledge capable of bringing the desired change that is being yearned for. Change doesn’t come by nagging, just talking, neither does it come by castigation. Change comes by working and walking the talking.

It is lamentable, nay humiliating that we have failed to understand that governance is bilateral in nature. It takes the combined efforts of the people and its leaders to make governance effective and realisable- it is never a one man affair. We are where we are today because we are doing the same things over and over again, expecting crystal and earth shaking results- that’s tantamount to insanity.

This writer firmly and unrepentantly beliefs(until the contrary is within reach) in making effective use of the available, positives values against the negatives; using the potentials against the deficiencies- good values. Imagine a Nigeria where you can misplace your pouch full of money in a public, somewhere, somehow- we know this things do happen- after three days, yet you can find it in the same position, place and state as it were; imagine a Nigeria where people will make honesty their watch word; imagine a Nigeria where people will see the life of every other Nigerian as precious as his/hers; imagine a Nigeria where peace, love and unity will be an obligation everyone is committed to perform. Can you envisage that? That can only happen when Nigerians begin to see the need to do so- a place where we will be the very change we clamour for. A state where law and order will thrive. In order words, a Nigeria void of cutting corners starts with us. The worth of any nation is depended on the amount of its values- love, compassion, tolerance, humility, patience, truth, honesty, peace, unity, diligence, apathy, justice, equity . . .

To sum up the aforementioned, let us look at this quote from an unknown author: “Industry is the mother of work.” Let’s put an end to the nagging campaign, and start working on ourselves- our values, beliefs, personalities. The Nigeria we seek and hope for begins with us, it means working in ourselves, raising our values. It starts from us.

I beg to sign out here. Be the Nigeria you’ll be proud of. It is a trite fact that good values are priceless to men of conscience. God bless Nigeria, and God bless you.

Savn Daniel

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UNTIL YOU CHANGE YOURSELF FOR GOOD, NIGERIA WILL REMAIN THE SAME

UNTIL YOU CHANGE YOURSEFL FOR GOOD, NIGERIA WILL BE THE SAME

PART 1

A Russian novelist, essayist and short story writer, who goes by the name Lev Nikolayevich Tolstoy, once opined, and I quote him verbatim: “Everyone thinks of changing the world, but no one thinks of changing himself.”

If we truly want or so desire for a modern, progressive and great Nigeria, then, its transformation process is a responsibility we all must share(thanks to Dr. Kuksenko). The brand of Nigeria we hanker after is tied to our deportment. It originates from charting the right affairs and embracing the acceptable cum good values. In all intent and purposes, as Nigerians, we are the problem and solution to this nation. Until we wake up from our slumber, fix up the mess and acknowledge these hard truths, we will remain where we are.

It is instructive to note that changing any democratic and civilised society leaves in shade mere tattling. It surpasses toy-matching [y]our appliances, making doddering propositions that have the proficiency of tearing this nation apart in a bid to be activists. It eclipses engendering defamatory and disparaging statements, knowing that it is potent of pulling the fence of nationhood painstakingly built by our founding fathers. As a people, contrary to our differences and what some monstrous politicians wants us to believe, we are one, and must strive to be the transformation we want to behold. If Nigeria is bad, it means we are bad- the retributive prospect of the whole melee is that we remain Nigerians as noted by the preamble of our grundnorm- The 1999 Constitution Of The federal Republic Of Nigeria(as amended); no matter how we try to shy away from these facts, this is Nigeria, our fatherland.

Most of the people blustering and yelling ‘corruption’ do not even know the [main] problem bedevilling this nation, yet, they want us to follow them. And this writer is under reasonable compulsion to ask: “Can a blind man lead another blind man?” If this nation we hold dear is dubbed a dysfunctional state, it is we who are dysfunctional not the state; we are the problem not the state. I think I can say this: “There is no such thing as a dysfunctional state. There are only dysfunctional people who are bent on making life difficult for others”. The trees are harmless, the land is fertile, the air is fresh, and its fragrance is just beautiful and pricelss . . . The solution and the problem lies with the people. Again, there is nothing wrong, bad or evil about Nigeria. Based on this writer’s observation, there are four categories of people in Nigeria: problem initiators; the problem munchers; unreasonable exploiter; the solution therapist; and the problem solver. It is either you contribute to the society or take away from Nigeria. Which are you?

One can not affect a system [positively] if he/she is not a change agent. You cannot change a system when your values are grossly despicable. You cannot change a system when there is something utterly wrong with the way you perceive people [who hold different views from yours]. You can not change the system when your creed, ethos and principles are anti-human. You cannot change the system if you see yourself as being better than everyone else. The mere criticising of the system/Government of the day, without a corresponding and effective action will change nothing. I reiterate, it will change nothing. Just as Dr. Kuksenko noted in page 10 of paragraph 1 of line 10 of his book, “Building Systems For National Transformation”: “If truth be told, only changed Nigerians, can change Nigeria. A new Nigeria can only emerge out of New Nigerians”. How sweet are truths that whenever it is said, the firmament acknowledges its truism, and the sanctity of its expression. When we begin to change our value system, something different begins to happen to us.

If we do not ask the right questions, we will never get the right answers, and may never do the right things. Until a man knows the direction of his compass, he may never know where he is navigating to, and even “why” he needs to plan-a-course. As a people, we must take responsibility for our welfare, for our actions and inactions. If every Nigerian will make it a duty to do what is right for six months, you’ll be amazed at what this nation will snowball into- stemming from the refusal to taking bribes; shunning corruption; being honest in all ramifications of our life; speak and preach the truth as if our life depended on it; respect differences; keep to time; respect our elders; value life; appeal to authorities; and obey their conscience. If we keep up with this attitude, Nigeria will be a better and enviable place to be. Mere nagging, ranting and cursing does not change a society, only good values do.

The United States of America, United Kingdom, Singapore and every other developed countries are what they are today because people got up and stood for what they preached, believed in and want. There is a saying that “Evil men thrive when good men do nothing”. Imagine what would happen if 70% of Nigerians changed themselves? Just envisage that! At this juncture, it is gut-wrenching to note that the Nigeria we’ve had over the years is a state where complaint, nagging, whining and rhetoric are charted as solutions. It is in this light that some have resorted to cheap blackmail as a struggle for liberty- the warped version of activism practised here in this neck of our wood.

Change is a gradual process, never automatic. Any change that is automatic comes with devastating casualties. For knowledge to be appreciated, it must be applicable, felt and pragmatic- it is the fusation of the abstract and pragmatic knowledge that brings change in a society. Could it be said that the problem with Nigeria and her citizens is not the knowledge( for the knowledge is there), but the ability to apply the desired knowledge capable of bringing the desired change that is being yearned for. Change doesn’t come by nagging, just talking, neither does it come by castigation. Change comes by working and walking the talking.

It is lamentable, nay humiliating that we have failed to understand that governance is bilateral in nature. It takes the combined efforts of the people and its leaders to make governance effective and realisable- it is never a one man affair. We are where we are today because we are doing the same things over and over again, expecting crystal and earth shaking results- that’s tantamount to insanity.

This writer firmly and unrepentantly beliefs(until the contrary is within reach) in making effective use of the available, positives values against the negatives; using the potentials against the deficiencies- good values. Imagine a Nigeria where you can misplace your pouch full of money in a public, somewhere, somehow- we know this things do happen- after three days, yet you can find it in the same position, place and state as it were; imagine a Nigeria where people will make honesty their watch word; imagine a Nigeria where people will see the life of every other Nigerian as precious as his/hers; imagine a Nigeria where peace, love and unity will be an obligation everyone is committed to perform. Can you envisage that? That can only happen when Nigerians begin to see the need to do so- a place where we will be the very change we clamour for. A state where law and order will thrive. In order words, a Nigeria void of cutting corners starts with us. The worth of any nation is depended on the amount of its values- love, compassion, tolerance, humility, patience, truth, honesty, peace, unity, diligence, apathy, justice, equity . . .

To sum up the aforementioned, let us look at this quote from an unknown author: “Industry is the mother of work.” Let’s put an end to the nagging campaign, and start working on ourselves- our values, beliefs, personalities. The Nigeria we seek and hope for begins with us, it means working in ourselves, raising our values. It starts from us.

I beg to sign out here. Be the Nigeria you’ll be proud of. It is a trite fact that good values are priceless to men of conscience. God bless Nigeria, and God bless you.

Savn Daniel

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LESSONS LEARNT FROM THE DEFEAT OF THE ALMIGHTY BRAZIL BY THE GERMAN TEAM.An article written by Savn Daniel, 09/07/14 7:19 pm

Yesterday’s football match between Brazilians and the Germans, that was held at mineirao Stadium, in Belo Horizonte ushered in a tempest never experience before. A remarkable soccer of soccer was made. So many injuries: avoidable inevitable psychological trauma was the parting gift of Brazilians. A though one. Though, no one imagined/believed that such a thing would have happened to the “indomitable” Brazil, but it happened anyway.

Failures, disappointment, defeat, humiliation, etcetera are all part of life. They create a balance in this planet of ours; the gateway to in-depth logical thinking are found within the parameters of defeat; they create a genuine atmosphere for reflection, and better strategy in order to win another day.

The world was awed yesterday, watching Brazil being shredded, mesmerised and hypnotised into pieces by the Germans. The unimaginable happened– Brazil was not just defeated, but humiliated, crushed, annihilated and cruelly tortured to death with no iota of pity/mercy. Not that they did not play better; not that they were not good as the Germans; not that they were inferior; not that they were not determined. No, that was not the case. The Brazilians like other countries(both the defeated and the survived teams for the time being) had their eyes on the trophy. There is no gainsaying that something was lacking amongst the Brazilian team–better strategy, and seizing the moment–that was what the Germans did or used against the Brazilians. Such is life.

In life, we fail in order to plan/strategise better. In fact, the true test of a [real] man is measured by his ability to handle frustration/disappointment. That is the hallmark of our existence. We are likely to lose touch with reality if we have not tasted failure/disgrace. We may never appreciate success, if we’ve not tasted the ground– he that is down should fear no fall. If we do not strategise well, our challenges will overpower us.

We’ve learnt that sometimes, in life, one may be basking in pass glory, just as the Brazil– they had that confidence that the victories won by the Peles, Roberto, Ronaldo et al could rub on the Germans, twisting their psychological performance, although disappointedly they(the Germans) refused to buy into.

We’ve also learnt that in life, defeat is inevitable. It could come/happen to anyone, irrespective of [y]our status. The Spaniards and the Brazilians are a good case of study. Both teams were humiliated to their knees in the ongoing #worldcup with no mercy.

We also learnt that challenges are part of life. It’s either we triumph over it or fall or otherwise whenever we confront same. As we advance higher in life, we are constantly confronted by all manner of obstacles– some ugly, painful or fearful. They stand to make us better(ironically). Just like the gold, it must pass through the fire in order for it to shine better. Metaphorically the Brazilian team needed to confront the Germans in order to re-appraise their assertion “as the home of football” in the minds/heart of the world.

We also learnt that the taste of victory is never permanent. Today it may be your turn, tomorrow it may be another person’s turn. Nothing is ever permanent save and except change which is constant. One cannot win all the time. Life is embedded in seasons: a time to laugh and a time to cry; a time to win and a time to lose; a time to rejoice and a time to be sad. Unfortunately for the Brazilians yesterday was a time to cry, a time to be sorrowful, a time to reflect and a time to re-strategise.

We learnt that there are people will should never joke with in our life. People whose presence matters and will determine much whenever they are around and not around us. As in the Brazilian case, the absence likes of Neymar and Thiego was a colossal dis-organisation, disorientation and threat to the Brazilians. Thiego, being amongst the world’s best defenders, would have created a difference– the humiliating goals would not have reached the point it climaxed to– 7: 1. Whatever may be the case, let’s always ensure that we value people who play key roles in our life. In fact, every individual we meet in life has a part to play in our life– the either make or mar us. But our main concern here is giving credence to those whose presence is capable of determining how far we’ll go in life(positively). Just as the Brazilian’s case– the absence of Neymar and Thiego, denied them the trophy.

I think there are more lessons enshrined in the disgraceful defeat of the Brazilian team by the Germans. Whatever may be said or learnt therein, it will suffice to state categorically that “in life we should expect anything”, and anything can happen. And that those things happen is not as important as how we handle/manage them.

Do have an inspired evening.

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IGNORANCE

Ignorance is not a blessing

Ignorance is not attractive

Ignorance is not humility

Ignorance is not spirituality

Ignorance is not wisdom.

Ignorance is the breeding for fear

Ignorance is the breeding for prejudice

Ignorance is the breeding ground for superstition.

Ignorance is the feeding trough for unmindful folks

Ignorance is the training field for slavery.

Ignorance is the mother of ignorance

Ignorance is the favourite plea of the guilty

Ignorance is the alibi of the slothful

Ignorance the rationalisation for immaturity

Ignorance is the originator for impudence.

Ignorance is blind

Ignorance is naked.

Ignorance conveys despairing Darkness

Ignorance never settles a dispute.

–Savn Daniel, 3rd of July, 2014 @ 8: 27 pm

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THE APPLICABILITY OF SILENCE

Silence is golden when it is applied circumspectively.
Ignore, discard, and avoid irrelevant, vexatious and all form
base(less) enchantment [be it in words or acts] in as much as
that do not merit your rejoinder/attention. Ignore them.

Your silence to a fool becomes ultimate when you respond in
the right context. There are times you need to place people in
their (be)fitting, folly and mediocrous state as ought to.

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